Friday, March 17, 2006

Not exactly a timely review...

The Flying Friar (written by Lying In the Gutters' Rich Johnston, penciled by Thomas Nachlik) is a graphic novella published by the late Speakeasy Comics before they fell apart. It was still available at a few on-line comic sites last time I checked, in case this review tickles your fancy. Now, I put off reading this for a while after I got it just because the art didn't really do anything for me (and it is pretty thick and intimidating for a floppy). But I buckled down and sat down to read it, and actually enjoyed it. The art kind of grew on me as the story proceeded, but it was an adjustment and I still wouldn't say that it was to my taste, but despite the art, the story was actually really nice. It's about a boy named Joseph who becomes a monk and gains the ability to levitate (as well as see things that others don't see). It's kind of a quiet story, about the boy's relationship to another local boy and his father who's interested in his gifts, as well as to the Catholic Church and the Pope as his powers manifest. Things sort of begin to spiral out of control and the tale gains this feeling of mounting dread about it. It's not flashy or gritty or anything though. It is a period comic, in the end, about a monk, and didn't exactly blow me away or anything. It was, however, a very nice, quaint tale, and I would recommend it if you like the look of the book, but unfortunately, art is something you have to consider when reading a comic...

1 comment:

Richard said...

Thanks for the review. Thomas Nachlik's art was chosen for its similarity to certain woodcut styles... in that it reflected the period the book was set in. I'm glad it grew on you a little, I found his storytelling skills wonderful.